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Noticeboard

PATIENT NOTICE

Retirement of Dr Diana Wielink

As many of you may be aware, Dr Wielink has been off work since April 2018 due to a serious illness.   It is with great sadness that we have to inform you that Dr Wielink has decided to retire from Wallingbrook, earlier than planned, due to her on-going health issues.

Dr Wielink joined Chulmleigh Health Centre in 1994 and has seen the group through many changes. Over the last 24 years Dr Wielink has made an immense contribution to the practice; she has been passionate about rural healthcare and instrumental in shaping and expanding the service, including the opening of the new practice in 2003. Dr Wielink has always been a true patient advocate and we know her patients will be devastated with this news.

We all send her our very best wishes for the future and that she takes this time to rest and recover.

We will be reallocating Dr Wielink’s patient list over the next month.

Please DO NOT ring up just to find out who your GP is.  We request that you ask the Patient Services Team when you next contact the surgery.

We would like to thank Dr Wielink’s patients for their understanding during this period.

Extended Opening Hours - 1 October 2018

As of 1 October 2018 Wallingbrook Health Group will be extending their opening hours .

Chulmleigh Reception will now open from 8.00am to 6.30pm, the telephone lines will be open from 8.30am to 6.00pm.

Chulmleigh Dispensary will be open from 8.30am to 6.00pm.

*Please note: Chulmleigh Dispensary will be closed on the 3rd Monday of each month between 1.00pm and 2.00pm for staff training.

Winkleigh Surgery opening hours remain as 8.30am to 1.00pm, 2.00pm to 6.00pm

 

 

How We Process & Share Your Data

 GDPR

What GDPR will mean for patients

The GDPR sets out the key principles about processing personal data, for staff or patients;

  • Data must be processed lawfully, fairly and transparently
  • It must be collected for specific, explicit and legitimate purposes
  • It must be limited to what is necessary for the purposes for which it is processed
  • Information must be accurate and kept up to date
  • Data must be held securely
  • It can only be retained for as long as is necessary for the reasons it was collected

There are also stronger rights for patients regarding the information that practices hold about them.  These include;

  • Being informed about how their data is used
  • Patient to have access to their own data
  • Patients can ask to have incorrect information changed
  • Restrict how their data is used
  • Move their patient data from one health organisation to another
  • The right to object to their patient information being processed (in certain circumstances)

What is GDPR?

GDPR stands for General Data Protection Regulations and is a new piece of legislation that will supersede the Data Protection Act.  It will not only apply to the UK and EU; it covers anywhere in the world in which data about EU citizens is processed.

The GDPR is similar to the Data Protection Act (DPA) 1998 (which the practice already complies with), but strengthens many of the DPA's principles.  The main changes are:

  • Practice must comply with subject access requests
  • Where we need your consent to process data, this consent must be freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous
  • There are new, special protections for patient data
  • The Information Commissioner's Office must be notified within 72 hours of a data breach
  • Higher fines for data breaches - up to 20 million euros

What is 'patient data'?

Patient data is information that relates to a single person, such as his/her diagnosis, name, age, earlier medical history etc.

What is consent?

Consent is permission from a patient - an individual's consent is defined as "any freely given specific and informed indication of his wishes by which the data subject signifies his agreement to personal data relating to him being processed."

The changes in GDPR mean that we must get explicit permission from patients when using their data.  This is to protect your right to privacy, and we ask you to provide consent to do certain things, like contact you or record certain information about you for your clinical records.

Individuals also have the right to withdraw their consent at any time.

 
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